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Browse for training, documents, and wiki content in our Resource Library with over 1,000 entries. Use the search box and/or filters on the left-hand side to refine the results by topic, document type, donor, and region/country.

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Insights on Payment Practices in Bangladesh: Cash and Mobile Finance Habits

This study, conducted by Dnet under a grant provided through USAID’s Mobile Solutions and Technical Assistance (mSTAR) project, captures how customer acquisition agents for Dnet’s Aponjon Program are using mobile phones. Aponjon is an mHealth initiative focused on maternal and child healthcare. Aponjon deploys agents across the country to increase subscriptions to the mobile phone service; agents receive an incentive payment based on the number of customer acquisitions they make.

EMMA: Emergency Market Mapping & Analysis

EMMA is a set of tools and guidance notes. It encourages and assists front-line humanitarian staff in sudden-onset emergencies to better understand, accommodate and make use of market-systems. It does not offer a simplistic blueprint for action. However, EMMA does provide accessible, relevant guidance to staff who are not already specialists in market analysis. The EMMA toolkit adds value to established humanitarian practices in diverse contexts.

Lessons Learned From 25 Years of Food Security Research, Capacity-Building, and Outreach

This resource provides a coherent and helpful summary of the Michigan State University (MSU)’s Food Security Group’s research, primarily from Sub-Saharan Africa. Lessons are presented in four areas: The first, Agricultural Growth and Food Security Strategies, suggests that small shrinking farm sizes in many countries will prevent many farmers from escaping poverty from on-farm production alone. Investments in education and non-agricultural sectors will be important.

Smallholder Commercialization: Processes, Determinants and Impact

This paper by the International Livestock Research Institute reviews the available literature on smallholder commercialization. Of particular interest, the paper discusses the arguments for smallholders to scale-up and commercialize existing food crops versus beginning to produce completely new crops specifically for sale. The production of high-value crops typically generates greater returns for producers, but also typically implies greater risks and barriers to entry. In general, commercialization is found to be positive for families, though the impacts vary.