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ASPIRES Family Care Qualitative Research Report

This report discusses the findings of research into the role economic strengthening plays in preventing unnecessary family-child separation and supporting the reintegration of formerly separated children into family care.

ASPIRES Family Care Summary Research Report

This report discusses the findings of research into how economic strengthening (ES) interventions can help prevent unnecessary separation of children from families as well as support the reintegration into family care of children who were already separated.

ASPIRES Evidence Briefs Series: Business Skills and Entrepreneurship Training and HIV Outcomes

Economic factors are linked to HIV risk behaviors, as well as outcomes, at every stage of the HIV care and treatment cascade. The ASPIRES project conducted an extensive review of the literature on these linkages to produce an evidence brief series highlighting how different household economic strengthening (HES) interventions may affect HIV prevention, testing, links to care, retention in care, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence.

Economic Strengthening Interventions to Address Known Barriers to PMTCT and Improve Health Outcomes: Review of the Evidence

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is known to be a significant contributor to infant morbidity and mortality in many countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Strategies for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) dramatically reduce the risk of HIV transmission to an infant—from nearly 40 percent to less than five percent. The PMTCT services can also serve as a gateway for HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support services for the mother and the whole family.

Increasing Access and Adherence to the PMTCT Cascade: Is There a Role for Economic Strengthening Interventions?

Interventions aimed at the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV are extremely effective but remain underutilized in many countries. Common economic barriers to PMTCT experienced by pregnant women with HIV are well documented. Addressing these economic barriers has the potential to improve PMTCT utilization and further reduce mother-to-child HIV transmission. This review examines the evidence of the effects economic strengthening (ES) interventions have on use of and adherence to PMTCT and other health services relevant to PMTCT cascade.

Household Economic Strengthening in Support of Prevention of Family-Child Separation and Children’s Reintegration in Family Care

This paper summarizes learning related to prevention of family-child separation, reintegration of children in family care, and economic interventions that might support these aims. It was prepared to inform the focus and development of a project that aims to use rigorous research to develop the evidence base related to the ways in which household-level economic strengthening interventions in low- and middle-income countries can help prevent the separation of children from their families and assist in reintegrating separated children in family care.

Keeping Children and Families together with Economic Strengthening

This report is an overview of the key issues addressed during the “Keeping Children and Families together with Economic Strengthening” symposium funded by USAID’s Displaced Children and Orphan’s Fund (DCOF) and implemented by FHI 360 through the STRIVE project.

Economic Strengthening for Female Sex Workers: A Review of the Literature

Female sex workers (FSWs) have been identified as a key population in the global fight against AIDS. In concentrated, mixed, and even generalized epidemics, the contribution of sex work toward the onward transmission of HIV is substantial.  HIV risk is directly related to the economic vulnerability of FSWs, the vast majority of whom report entering sex work for financial reasons due to lack of alternative employment opportunities.