Resource Library

Browse for training, documents, and wiki content in our Resource Library with over 1,000 entries. Use the search box and/or filters on the left-hand side to refine the results by topic, document type, donor, and region/country.

Find a Resource

Showing 14 results

Insights on Payment Practices in Bangladesh: Cash and Mobile Finance Habits

This study, conducted by Dnet under a grant provided through USAID’s Mobile Solutions and Technical Assistance (mSTAR) project, captures how customer acquisition agents for Dnet’s Aponjon Program are using mobile phones. Aponjon is an mHealth initiative focused on maternal and child healthcare. Aponjon deploys agents across the country to increase subscriptions to the mobile phone service; agents receive an incentive payment based on the number of customer acquisitions they make.

Training Manual for Using Mobile Money in Bangladesh

This training manual provides a detailed guide on how to use the mobile money products of Bangladesh’s two market leaders, bKash and DBBL. It provides a side by side comparison of the steps that users need to take in order to make transactions and perform other actions. This manual is written in Bangla.

Emerging Insight #31: Discounted outpatient services: a way to keep clients

The Swayam Shikshan Prayog (SSP) project in India has found that the use of outpatient services by clients is associated with increased renewals. As an added benefit of its cashless inpatient health insurance product, SSP offers clients a discount of approximately 50 percent on consultation fees from a network of local physicians and a 40 to 70 percent discount on the retail price of drugs. This Emerging Insight highlights the project's observations around client behavior related to outpatient services.

Social Networks and Insurance Take-Up: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in China

This Microinsurance Paper estimates the role of information in insurance take-up using data from a randomized experiment in rural China where information was either offered directly through financial education or accessed indirectly through social networks. Unlike previous studies, the experimental design allows to not only to identify the causal effect of social networks, but also to differentiate the various channels through which they operate, including the improvement of negotiating power, imitation, and social learning of insurance benefits.